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Past Colloquia | Film+Digital Media / Social Documentary at UC Santa Cruz

Past Colloquia

  1. For access to the optional readings from the book and more information, please email ihr@ucsc.edu.  

  2. Lecture and Q&A with David James
    Presented by the Center for Documentary Arts and Research

  3. Title: "The Perfect Colonial Storm: Atinga and Iconoclasm in Southwestern Nigeria"

  4. Title: Apocalypse in Paradise: Niki de Saint Phalle in Los Angeles"

  5. Title: "Militant Research"

  6. Title: "The Cybernetic Hypothesis"

  7. Title: "Sympoiesis: Becoming-with in Multispecies Muddles"

  8. Title: "Creative Challenges in the Production of Documentary Animation."

  9. Title: “What Cinema Is and Isn't: Animating the Cinéfils”

  10. Title: "A Museological Bermuda Triangle: Coloniality in Contemporary Spanish Exhibition Practices"

  11. Date: February 4, 2013
    Time: 7:00-9:00 PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C), with a reception to follow in Communications 139

    Title: "Places of the Spectator:  West Hollywood and Queer Video in the 1980s"

  12. Date: January 28, 2013
    Time: 7:00 - 9:00PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C), with a reception to follow in Communications 139

    Title: “Remobilizing Moving Image Archives: The case of the Arkivi Qendror Shteteror i Filmit (Albanian National Film Archives)”

  13. Date: January 14, 2013
    Time: 7:00-9:00 PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C), with a reception to follow in Communications 139

    Title: “Uplift Cinema: African American Filmmaking North and South, 1909-1915”

  14. Date: November 19, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C), with reception to follow in Communications 139

    Title: "Repatriation and Second Life: Return of the Masks to Kodiak Alaska"

  15. Date: November 5, 2012
    Time: 7:00 PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C), with a reception to follow in Communications 139

    Title: "Out of Place: Migration and Nostalgia in Ousmane Sembène's 'Black Girl'"

  16. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents: 

    Trinh T. Minh-ha
    Professor, Department of Rhetoric and Department of Gender & Women's Studies, UC Berkeley

    "Forces and Forms: 'Where The Road is Alive' "

    When: April 16, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C)

  17. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents: 

    Amelia Jones
    Professor and Grierson Chair, Visual Culture in the Department of Art History & Communication Studies at McGill University

    "Seeing Differently: The Trace of the Subject in Contemporary Art"

    When: April 9, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 139

  18. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents: 

    Helga Tawil-Souri
    Assistant Professor, Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University

    "Visual Conflict of and in Palestine-Israel"
    When: March 5, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 139

  19. Film and Digital Media and History of Art and Visual Culture present: 

    Nishant Shah
    "Digital Natives and the Myth of the Revolution: Questioning the Radical Potential of Citizen Action"

    Date: Monday, March 5, 2012
    Time: 4:00-5:30PM
    Location: Porter D-245

  20. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents: 

    Hagi Kenaan
    Senior Lecturer, Department of Philosophy, Tel Aviv University

    "What Makes an Image Ethical?"
    When: February 27, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C)

  21. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents:

    Leigh Raiford
    Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley

    "Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare: Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle"
    When: January 30, 2012
    Time: 7:00-9:00PM
    Location: Communications 139

  22. The Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium Presents: 

    Professor Caren Kaplan, American Studies, UC Davis
    Affiliated faculty in Film Studies, Cultural Studies, and Science & Technology Studies

    "The Visual Culture of Stealth: Interpretation and Deception in Militarized Aeromobility" PRE-LECTURE READING
    When: Monday, November 14, 2011
    Time: 7:00 - 9:00PM
    Location: Communications 139

  23. Mark your calendars! These are the dates for our Visual and Media Cultures Colloquium for the 2011-12 academic year: 

    Fall 2011
    November 14 - Caren Kaplan

    Winter 2012

    January 30 - Leigh Raiford

    February 27 - Hagi Kenaan

    March 5 - Helga Tawil-Souri

    Spring 2012

    April 9 - Amelia Jones
    April 16 - Trinh. T. Minh-Ha

     

  24. The Division of Arts and Film & Digital Media Department presents...

    Bridging the Gap: Celebrating Our Alumni Working in Film, Television & Digital Media - A Film Symposium

    Roundtable discussions, screenings and workshops

     

    Special Celebration: Honoring Emeritus Professor Chip Lord

     

  25. Date: May 23, 2011
    Time: 6:00-8:00 PM
    Location: Communications 150 (Studio C)

     

    The Film & Digital Media Department and the Deans of Arts Division presents
    the Inagural Arts Division Research Award Lecture: 

    Peter Limbrick, Associate Professor

  26. Date: May 16, 2011

    Time: 6:00-8:00 PM

    Location: Porter College, D-245

    Reception: 5:00-6:00 PM, Porter College D-263

     

    Faye Ginsburg: Screening Disbilities: Visual Fields, Public Culture and the Atypical Mind in the 21st Century

     

  27. Date: May 2, 2011

    Time: 6:00-8:00 PM

    Location: Porter College, D245

     

    David Pendleton: Reasons to Believe in This World, or Responsibilities of a Film Programmer

     

  28. The Center for Visual and Performance Studies presents the international and Interdisciplinary conference: 

     

    Pasolini's Body: New Directions in Pasolini Scholarship

     

    For a complete list of speakers and conference schedule, please visit: http://vps.ucsc.edu/pasolini

     

    Curated by Mark Franko, Center for Visual and Performance Studies, with Deanna Shemek, and the VPS Steering Committee

  29. Date: Monday, April 18th 

    Time: 6:00-8:00 PM 

    Location: Digital Arts Research Center, room 108

    W.J.T. Mitchell

    "Seeing Madness: Insanity, Media, and Visual Culture"

     

  30. details to be announced soon!

  31. The Winter F&DM/HAVC Colloquium Series begins with a talk by Jack Halberstam,

    Professor of English, American Studies and Ethnicity and Gender Studies at USC.

     

    Flying the Coop: Stop Motion Animation and The Cinema of Escape

  32. "Musical Speech and the Digital Regime of the Image"

    The first guest for our new colloquium series will be Kara Keeling (Associate Professor, USC).

    Please note the change in location. 

     

    Karl Marx's well known phrase "poetry from the future" references a formal and temporal material disruption that functions primarily on the level of affect in ways that resist narration and qualitative description.  This presentation offers "poetry from the future" as a kind of musical speech.

  33. Spring Quarter's Film & Digital Media Colloquium Series continues with Professor Victoria Johnson (UC Irvine).

  34. Spring Quarter Film & Digital Media Colloquium.

    "Production Cultures:  Critical and Cultural Dimensions of Film/Video Labor"

    John Caldwell, Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at UCLA

     

  35. Film & Digital Media Winter Colloquium Series

  36. Professor Juhasz will address her experience in Fall 2007 and Fall 2008 when she taught an experimental online course to learn the strengths and limitations of moving a set of common experiences (teaching, learning, and “writing”) fully into the digital space.  Professor Juhasz now faces the challenges of translating the trials and tribulations of adapting her experiments in Web 2.0 pedagogy into a digital “book.”  Her work thus thematizes and reflects on a new era of digital arts and academic publi

  37. The first of our yearly colloquia features Professor Tasha Oren from the University of Wisconsin.

    Through its institutional structures, textual production, and points of reception, television has taken part in articulations of cultural and national identity all over the globe. How is this sense of "the local" changing as media grows increasingly mobile and new global television forms (like the reality format) dominate worldwide programming?

  38. Over the past fifteen years, CG hordes, swarms, armies, armadas, flocks and crowds have appeared in popular films with the aid of motion capture technologies and software programs such as MASSIVE, Render Man, and Stadium Guy.
  39. A remarkable and unexpected achievement of Iranian postrevolutionary cinema is the significant and signifying role of women both behind and in front of the camera.

  40. To see Still Life as social documentary that shows us the ‘other China’ that most of us do not know is to largely miss the point.  While the film for the most part adheres to a documentary style, it can also introduce at crucial moments bizarre, anti-realist, details.  If the film documents a social space, it is a space that has undergone a twist, just as socialism in China has been twisted into 'the socialist market economy.'  Such a space cannot be approached directly through straight documentary, but only deduced through the bizarre effects that it produces; effects

  41. Episodes of anti-state insurgency are marked by an obsession with maps:  cartographic narrations of rebel-occupied territories, ruins, and reclaimed land.  In 1857, in the north Indian city of Lucknow, colonial, social, and spatial relations were violently reordered by anti-British revolts.  This talk discusses tensions between a visual prose of counter-insurgency confronted everywhere by a splintering investment in land for the proliferating public of photography and early cinema.  At the heart of this discussion is an effort to theorize the
  42. This talk considers a key moment in the consolidation of the studio system and proposes that Hollywood public relations of the early 1920s legitimated corporate authority by successfully establishing the terms in which the history of the American motion-picture industry could be written.

  43. In 1917 the aptly named Colonial Films produced a religious drama, Tepeyac, that retold the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe's miraculous appearance to the Indian Juan Diego.  The film offers viewers multiple opportunities to read Mexico's history as part of its modern identity.  This talk will examine Mexican film producers' attempts to address national subject matter in the cosmopolitan idiom of narrative cinema, and the connections between the politics of gender proposed by the film and Mexican national production during the late 1930s and 1940s, the Golden Age of Mexican

  44. This talk approaches a pivotal moment of queer television history, the appearance of the first openly gay man on American television (in 1973, An American Family), through some reflection on the convergence of queer and televisual times.  Looking backward from the last episode of An American Family, occasioned by the death of Lance in 2001, I explore the repeated action of coming out in relation to television seriality.
    Talk sponsored by the Film & Digital Media Department and supported by Porter College Visiting Artists and Lecturers.

  45. Introduced by Mark Williams, exhibition manager at the New Zealand Film Archive.

  46. This two-part talk consists of Professor Everett's recent work on digital and new media that includes her participation in the MacArthur Foundation's "field-building" endeavor conceptualized as the Digital Media and Learning Initiative.  Professor Everett will discuss her involvement in this multi-year, multi-million dollar initiative, particularly her work on youth experiences with digital media technologies and computer games.  This aspect of her work focuses on the racialized meaning-encryption-decryption feedback loop at work in contemporary popular computer games.  Her inte